ICOET 2019
ICOET 2019

Requirements and Guidelines for Abstract Submission

Overview

ICOET invites abstract submissions for Podium (oral) presentations, Lightning Talk presentations, Poster presentations, and Poster presentations at its 2019 conference. Presentations at ICOET address diverse topics which describe current project or planning activities, research findings, emerging issues, or best practices related to the interface between transportation systems and ecosystems.

Presentations (lectern, lightning talk, poster, multi-media)
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Events (panel, session, workshop, symposium)
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Registration for ICOET 2019 will open in late March, please come back then to register.

Submission Deadline

Abstracts must be submitted online by March 29, 2019 at 11:59 PM Pacific U.S. Time.

Submission Website

Submit your abstract(s) online via the Call for Abstracts web page at https://icoet.net. The submission website includes forms to enter author(s) information, title and abstract, and relevant topic area. Contact information for the Primary author is required to complete the submission process.

This guidelines document includes templates on pages 10-11 to assist in writing and organizing your abstract using a word processing application such as Microsoft Word. When your abstract is ready to submit, type or paste it into the submission website. Authors may submit multiple abstracts for consideration, but must submit them separately.

Presentation Type and Program Topic

When submitting your abstract, indicate your preference for Presentation Type: a Podium presentation, a Lightning Talk presentation, a Poster presentation, or a Multi-media presentation. See page 3 for a description of the presentation types.

Also when submitting, indicate the general Program Topic that best fits your abstract’s subject matter. Review the topic categories on pages 4-7 and examples of subtopics within each category. Presentations are not limited to the topics listed; all abstracts that address ecology and transportation concerns will be considered. Authors may submit multiple abstracts on various subjects that fit within the program topics.

Submission and Notification Timeline

Abstracts submitted to ICOET are first reviewed and scored by a team of industry peers—practitioners and researchers with understanding of the abstract’s subject matter. Reviewer scores and comments are then forwarded to the ICOET Program Committee for final selection. All Primary authors/organizers will be notified of their abstract selection status.

  • March 29, 2019 – Deadline for abstract submissions.
  • May 31, 2019 – Primary authors and organizers notified of acceptance for presentations/events.
  • June 28, 2019 – Deadline to submit revised, final abstracts and copyright forms.
  • July 12, 2019 – All presenters must register and pay the conference fee by this date.
  • August 30, 2019 – Deadline to submit papers and poster PDFs for conference proceedings.
  • September 22, 2019 – Conference begins.
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Presentation Types

Each ICOET abstract submission must indicate a preference for one of the presentation types described below. Consider which type is best suited to convey your topic to the ICOET audience, allowing sufficient time to prepare your required materials prior to conference as well as plan for an engaging presentation.

Note: During the selection process, the Program Committee may invite an abstract author to present in a different format than requested. This can occur for various reasons, such as when abstract reviewers recommend a particular format for a presentation, or when improving diversity of the program topics requires the Committee to expand or limit selected abstracts to a presentation type that can best fit into the program.

Podium (oral) Presentations

Scientific research papers, case studies, and similar technical topics are presented at ICOET in 90-minute podium sessions which run concurrently in the agenda on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Four topics are grouped per session, with 20 minutes allotted for each presenter to address the topic and answer questions from the audience. Presenters use PowerPoint slides and other audiovisual media to support their remarks. Abstracts and papers of podium presentations are published in the ICOET online proceedings.

Lightning Talks (oral)

Lightning talks are intended to spark discussion on new ideas, emerging issues, or developing research. Lighting talks are allotted 5 minutes each within a 90-minute session, and may be grouped by the Program Committee in thematic “sets.” Each set of talks is followed by a brief audience discussion period. A lightning session includes up to 12 talks—with at least 30 total minutes of discussion—and runs concurrently with podium sessions on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Presenters may use limited PowerPoint slides, although no time is scheduled between individual presentations for questions and answers. Abstracts of lightning talks are published in the ICOET online proceedings.

Poster Presentations

Posters at ICOET are displayed in a group setting and scheduled for one of two 120-minute sessions on Monday and Tuesday. Poster sessions are plenary events so all conference participants may attend. Authors must be present with the posters to discuss their information with interested attendees. Authors are encouraged to display posters before their scheduled session for allow additional time for viewing by participants. Poster abstracts and PDF images are published in the ICOET online proceedings.

Multi-media Presentations

New this year! Multi-media presentations are presented either in a context similar to a session (or within a session), during the poster sessions, or as a stand-alone exhibit. Oral sessions run concurrently, poster sessions are plenary events so all conference participants may attend, but of fixed duration, and exhibits may be stand-alone exhibits with the author present. Multi-media abstracts and excerpted PDF images are published in the ICOET online proceedings.

Session Proposals

Complete sessions are organized around a specific topic, with all presenters invited and coordinated by the session organizer. These sessions typically are 90 minutes in length to run concurrently with podium sessions. Proposals for sessions longer than 90 minutes, including Sunday pre-conference and Monday-Wednesday evening sessions, also are considered. Successful session proposals will include >50% confirmed speakers, who must submit also abstracts, with the understanding that the Program Committee or Organizer may add other speakers to the session to complete it, as needed. Organized sessions emphasize audience participation in combination with prepared presentations, with sufficient time in their agenda for the audience to engage with presenters in a meaningful dialogue about the topic.

 

Workshop Proposals

Complete workshops are organized around a specific topic or technique, with any presenters invited and coordinated by the workshop organizer. These sessions will be 20-60 minutes in length, at the discretion of the Program Committee and the organizer and will run concurrently with podium sessions. Successful workshop proposals will include 100% confirmed speakers (which could be just the organizer) and will not focus on a single product (e.g., one brand or manufacturer) or service provider (e.g., “this is how I do things”). If you are interested in focusing on a single product or service, please consider becoming an exhibitor. Organized workshops emphasize involvement by conference-participants in activities, with only brief podium presentations about the topic. If you want to have a series of speakers talk about a specific topic or technique, please consider a panel or session.

Symposium Proposals

Complete symposia are organized around a specific topic, with all presenters invited and coordinated by the symposium organizer. Symposia are half-day in length to run concurrently with podium sessions. Successful symposium proposals will include 100% confirmed speakers, who must also submit abstracts. Organized symposia emphasize audience participation in combination with prepared presentations, with sufficient time in their agenda for the audience to engage with presenters in a meaningful dialogue about the topic.

Panel Proposals

Complete panels are organized around a specific topic, with all presenters invited and coordinated by the panel organizer. These panels will typically be 90 minutes in length to run concurrently with podium sessions. Successful panel proposals must include 100% confirmed speakers, who are not required to submit abstracts, but must detail what the proposed speakers will discuss. Organized panels emphasize audience participation in combination with prepared presentations, with sufficient time in their agenda for the audience to engage with presenters, including a question and answer period.

 

Program Topics

When submitting an abstract for a podium presentation, lightning talk or poster presentation, choose one of the following general topic headings that best fits your subject matter. Authors proposing a complete session should choose the Session Proposal topic when submitting your abstract.

The subtopics listed for each program topic are those of interest from the ICOET organizing committee and from the recent post-conference survey of ICOET attendees. Abstracts are not limited to these subtopics.

Sustainability and Resilience in Transportation Systems

Planning for Transportation Ecology

Partnerships and Collaborative Approaches for Improving Transportation Ecology

Policy and Regulatory Developments in Transportation

Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, and Storm-Related Adaptation

Mitigation for Transportation Projects

Vegetation Management within Transportation Corridors

Stormwater and Water Quality Management in Transportation

Aquatic Species/Ecosystem and Wetland Interactions with Transportation

Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecosystem Interactions with Transportation

Transportation Ecology in Construction, Operations and Maintenance

Emerging Issues and New Directions in Transportation Ecology

 

Partnerships and Collaborative Approaches for Improving Transportation Ecology

  • Programmatic agreements or partnerships to achieve regulatory compliance, process improvement and streamlining, project development – successfully linking the environmental and transportation planning processes to leverage resources, expedite processes, and improve efficiencies to accelerating project delivery
  • Programmatic conservation and decision-making related to long-range transportation needs, on landscape level or regional scale data
  • Human dimensions of collaboration and interdisciplinary approaches – facilitation, negotiation, conflict resolution
  • Examples of successful contracts, memorandums of understanding (MOU) and memorandums of agreement (MOA) – includes risk-driven contracts and functional contracts (responsibilities of the contractor), collaborations involving the contribution of funding (the mechanisms) for large-scale advance mitigation projects, successes/lessons learned
  • Tribal and Environmental Justice coordination on transportation projects
  • Engaging the public and community input, perspectives, and partnerships on transportation projects – public/private partnerships (P3), working groups, coalitions, etc.
  • Changes in public opinion and political focus to improve transportation ecology
  • Cross-disciplinary experiences, especially between biologic or environmental fields and engineering fields

Sustainability and Resilience in Transportation Systems

  • Planning, designing and building transportation systems for sustainability and resilience
  • Reducing the carbon footprint of transportation – envisioning a sustainable transportation system in urban, suburban, and rural areas; carbon accounting system for residential and commercial development, cities, states, and nations
  • Linking habitat restoration, watershed recovery, habitat connectivity, and other conservation strategies into transportation projects
  • Asset management and holistic approaches to managing transportation systems and ecosystems
  • Energy development (e.g., oil, gas, wind) impacts on transportation infrastructure and ecosystems
  • Climate change adaptation and mitigation – impacts to transportation and adaptation considerations with ecological processes in mind
  • Transportation responses to extreme weather and natural disasters – built-in infrastructure resiliency
  • Sea-level change impacts on coastal infrastructure and ecosystems
  • Transportation, natural resource, and land use interactions

Planning for Transportation Ecology

  • Integrating landscape-level transportation planning with landscape-level wildlife/habitat connectivity planning – how are plans developed, implemented, etc. across agency jurisdictions and missions
  • Incorporating progressive ecological considerations into transportation policy (e.g., Complete Streets)
  • Planning efforts involving both highways and local roads to create sustainable urban landscapes
  • Decision-support systems and how they are being developed, used, and deployed
  • Process improvements for including ecological aspects in other parts of the transportation planning, construction and maintenance process
  • Crossing state boundaries and borders or agency jurisdictions with transportation ecology projects
  • Ecological aspects of a project incorporated more efficiently and cost effectively
  • Human dimensions of wildlife management – role in transportation planning

Policy and Regulatory Developments in Transportation

  • Environmental permitting and approval processes around the globe – comparisons and contrasts between U.S. policies and those of other countries; case studies of successful implementation and applications for future projects
  • Innovative approaches to addressing regulatory issues
  • Recently-implemented and forthcoming federal legislation, guidance and regulatory initiatives and its impact on transportation ecology
  • Effective tracking of environmental commitments through project development
  • Developing a national plan for wildlife connectivity
  • The effect of political climate (national and global) on transportation ecology issues
  • New methodologies for environmental analysis

Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, and Storm-Related Adaptation

  • Studies of the impact of climate change on transportation and associated ecosystems
  • Studies of the impact of adaptation to climate change on ecosystems (e.g., coastal armoring impact on beaches)
  • Methods for measuring or assessing impacts of sea level rise on transportation and associated ecosystems
  • Mitigation methods to reduce climate change impacts (e.g., reduced greenhouse gas emissions)
  • Co-adaptation of transportation and ecosystems to climate change and sea level rise
  • Co-adaptation to sea level rise and increased storm intensity and frequency

Mitigation for Transportation Projects

  • Advance mitigation at the project and regional levels in urban and rural areas – examples, outcomes, lessons learned
  • Innovative and new compensatory mitigation methods in transportation
  • Ecosystem-level mitigation – looking beyond the road segment to transportation impacts on ecosystem health at a regional scale
  • Effective long-term mitigation strategies
  • Examining the link between mitigation and restoration
  • Improved mitigation outcomes from permitting
  • Integrated multi-resource, multi-agency mitigation – more “bang for the buck” – crediting schemes and commitment tracking
  • Landscape-scale or watershed approach to mitigation at federal and state levels – how past and future highway project impacts are being addressed through mitigation
  • Measuring the need for mitigation – how much mitigation is enough?
  • Mitigating impacts to endangered/protected species at the state level and across boundaries
  • Mitigation for aesthetic impacts
  • Mitigation of edge and border effects – avoiding the spread of exotic species, forest fires, etc.
  • Programmatic mitigation planning and collaborative mitigation efforts
  • Terrestrial, stream, and wetland mitigation crediting strategies
  • Using ecosystem services crediting to promote improved mitigation and permit streamlining
  • Mitigation banks
  • Mitigation for smaller species – birds, bats, invertebrates, reptiles, and amphibians 

Vegetation Management within Transportation Corridors

  • Addressing indirect and cumulative effects of transportation on vegetation eco-communities
  • Ecological restoration and habitat improvement using vegetation
  • Promoting health of honey bees, butterflies, and other pollinators in transportation corridors
  • Right-of-way maintenance strategies for pollinator habitats
  • Multiple benefits of roadside vegetation planning, implementation, and management practices including stormwater management, slope stabilization (vegetative riprap), wildflowers, pollinators, wildlife crossings, listed species, etc.
  • Plant conservation and landscaping techniques
  • Re-vegetation and restoration of roadsides – planning and implementation
  • Measures taken to protect infrastructure from destructive or invasive species and issues with re-vegetation and invasive species
  • Reintroduction of native species

Stormwater and Water Quality Management in Transportation

  • Eco-friendly, sustainable, and low-maintenance stormwater best management practices
  • Effect of climate change on future stormwater practices and infrastructure
  • Large pavement structures – effects on microclimates, and mitigating polluted runoff
  • Improving water quality/water resource impacts and stormwater management for transportation projects
  • Watershed approach to water quality planning and the intersection with conservation planning
  • Examining feasibility of off-site water quality mitigation
  • Soils, hydrology (floodplain management) and the effect of stormwater management

Aquatic Species/Ecosystem and Wetland Interactions with Transportation

  • Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating transportation impacts to all aquatic ecosystems - streams, wetlands, and aquatic, semi-aquatic, wetland-dependent species
  • Indirect and cumulative effects of transportation infrastructure and/or construction practices on aquatic wildlife, wetlands, and related ecosystems
  • Hydroacoustic monitoring, noise and barotrauma effects on aquatic species from construction and operations
  • Restoration of riparian, stream, estuarine, wetland, and coastal areas impacted by transportation projects
  • Stream crossings, fish passage, aquatic organism passage, and aquatic habitat connectivity
  • Bioassessment tools for stream restoration projects, pre- and post-construction monitoring efforts

Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecosystem Interactions with Transportation

  • Avoiding and mitigating transportation impacts to all terrestrial ecosystems and wildlife, especially endangered species
  • Transportation impacts and issues related to birds (e.g., Migratory Bird Treaty Act), bats (e.g., white-nose syndrome), and insects
  • Noise and barotrauma effects on terrestrial species from construction and operations
  • Indirect and cumulative effects of transportation infrastructure and/or construction practices on terrestrial ecosystems and wildlife
  • Habitat mitigation approaches
  • Lighting pollution from transportation facilities and its effects on wildlife movements or habitat occupation
  • Animal-vehicle collision prevention and reduction strategies
  • Regional-scale modeling to identify priority crossing locations for long-range large-scale connectivity across agency jurisdictions or state/ownership boundaries
  • Connectivity and the role of crossing structures in landscape-scale ecological networks
  • Crossing structure engineering design, monitoring, and performance studies, including small mammal/herpitile passages and benefits, at-grade wildlife crosswalks, etc.
  • Ensuring habitat connectivity for transportation projects – changing the culture of transportation agencies to more readily embrace planning for wildlife crossings in projects; seeing the infrastructure investment as providing more than limited benefits to wildlife
  • Examining the feasibility of, and impediments to, wildlife crossings (such as private land owners, potential development, agency jurisdictions, land use/ownership) and how to work through these challenges
  • Effectiveness of various designs of wildlife fencing, guards, and jump-outs including end-of-fence treatments or strategies for wildlife fences
  • New technology and methodology for capturing wildlife-vehicle collision data (e.g., smartphone apps and citizen science)
  • Large wildlife migration
  • States working together to protect movement patterns across state boundaries
  • Power line/pipeline easements and connectivity issues

Transportation Ecology in Construction, Operations and Maintenance

  • Cost-effective and sustainable transportation maintenance programs
  • Maintenance for strengthening biodiversity
  • Role of maintenance and asset management in wildlife mitigation efforts, such as right-of-way maintenance for pollinator habitats
  • Integrating new processes and managing new costs for maintenance of wildlife passages and other ecological measures into existing DOT maintenance procedures
  • Lessons learned from monitoring that have improved design guidelines and operations and maintenance practices for transportation ecology practices (wildlife crossings, mitigation, etc.)
  • Innovative construction techniques and materials reuse and recycling
  • Successful approaches for managing invasive species along transportation systems during construction, operations and maintenance
  • Road-kill composting or other innovative disposal/treatment ideas

Emerging Issues and New Directions in Transportation Ecology

  • Effective strategies for visualization/communication of transportation ecology issues to decision-makers and stakeholders
  • Role of transportation in controlling the spread of diseases affecting animal, plant, or human populations
  • Applying Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related technologies in transportation ecology – including GIS modeling, use of unmanned aerial vehicles, wildlife cameras and remote sensing, etc.
  • How advances in pedestrian modalities can advance transportation ecology
  • How alternative technologies for vehicles and infrastructure – driverless vehicles, smart/connected vehicles, solar roads, etc. – can advance transportation ecology

Other:

Non-Highway (Rail, Aviation, Maritime) and Transit Transportation Ecology Issues

Urban Transportation Ecology Issues

Preparing Your Abstract

Podium, Lightning Talk, Multi-media, and Poster Abstracts

An abstract is a concise summary of the topic you wish to present at ICOET. It should describe your project or study objectives, methodology, current or anticipated results or outcomes, major significance and implications of the results or outcomes and, if applicable, recommendations for future research.

Your abstract should include enough detail to convey what will be learned from reading your paper, poster, or from attending your presentation at conference. The abstract should be complete and understandable on its own, and should not require additional references for clarity. Avoid using figures, tables, equations, undefined acronyms, or reference citations in your abstract.

Abstracts for Podium, Lightning Talks, and Poster presentations must include:

  • Title of the abstract topic.
  • Abstract (500 words or less) of the subject matter to be presented.
  • Primary author (required) and any co-author contact information.
  • Program topic that best fits the abstract content.
  • Author’s requested presentation type.

Event Proposals

Complete event proposals include facilitated panel discussions, interactive workshops, oral sessions, and symposia. When submitting your event proposal abstract, select the Event proposal program topic.

Proposed events are organized around a specific subject related to one or more of the program topic areas. Except in the case of oral sessions, all presenters in the event are invited and coordinated by the organizer. Audience participation is a key part of a successful and well-received event. Sufficient time in your event’s agenda should be planned for the audience to engage with presenters in a meaningful dialogue about the topic, including a question and answer period.

Your event proposal abstract should describe how individual presentations and discussion will be tailored to the ICOET audience. A mix of presenters exploring interdisciplinary connections within ecology and transportation is preferred, including both scientific and transportation agency perspectives. Presenters should offer a range of expertise and perspectives, with all presentations clearly contributing to a cohesive session. Organizers should promote a balanced discussion and avoid bias toward a particular perspective.

Event proposal abstracts must include:

  • Title of the session topic.
  • Primary organizer (required) and any co-organizer contact information.
  • Facilitator and Presenter(s) contact information and biographical sketches (100 words or less per bio). Indicate which presenters are confirmed and/or tentative at the time of abstract submission.
  • Description (500 words or less) of the session content. Include a discussion of the goals, objectives, relevance to current or emerging issues in ecology and transportation, and applicability of the concepts, practices, and/or lessons learned from your session.
  • Structure (250 words or less) of the session. Include the sequence of presenters and topics, presentation method(s) to be used—e.g., podium lecture, panel discussion, breakout groups—and how audience participation will be incorporated into the session.

The Program Committee may request additional details prior to confirming selection of a proposed session.

Writing Your Abstract: The IMRaD Format

IMRaD Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion—is a scientific writing format for preparing a coherent and well-organized abstract for a research paper or poster. The format helps ensure that all important elements are covered systematically and in a sequence that your audience can easily follow.

Note: While the IMRaD format is recommended for writing a research-focused abstract, it may not be entirely applicable to all ICOET abstract topics, in particular Session proposals. Use your best judgement.

Each IMRaD component answers a question:

  • Introduction: Why did you start? Answer this question by describing the subject of the presentation, current practice, and purpose of the current study. Clearly set forth the issue, problem, or question addressed. This section helps the reader understand the rationale of the presentation.
  • Methods: What did you do? Describe the approach to the problem and/or research design, including, for example, data collection methods or statistical analyses used. This section will help readers evaluate the validity of the work.
  • Results: What did you find? Present the findings and outcomes. In your paper or poster, figures, tables, or graphs can be used in this section to convey the information. Results should be descriptive, and should not interpret the findings or include recommendations for practitioners.
  • Discussion: What does it mean? This section should focus on interpreting the results and outcomes. Include a brief summary of the most important results, compare the findings with previous studies and/or current practice, and describe any strengths or weaknesses. The discussion should also cover the degree to which the results or outcomes can be generalized to other locations, species, or types of projects or organizations. This section should inform the reader of the implications, importance, and meaning of the results and outcomes presented in the previous section.
  • Conclusion: What can be learned? Although a brief summary of conclusions can be included at the end of the discussion section, making it a separate section helps readers identify the main conclusions that can be drawn from the study. This section should not simply rehash previous sections, but should clearly and concisely present the major conclusions. As applicable, future research directions can be described in this section, including plans to continue the current study.

These additional online resources are available online to help in writing your abstract:

Remember, many ICOET attendees seek information that can be readily applied to their own work so, when appropriate to the subject matter, your proposed presentation should go beyond reporting data and impacts to demonstrating practical, sustainable, applied management solutions. Also, be certain to highlight in your abstract all professional collaborations, interagency partnerships, and interdisciplinary approaches that are relevant to the solutions you present.

Abstract Template for Podium, Lightning Talk, and Poster Presentations

To keep a record of your submission, ou may copy/paste the text below into your word processing application, then upload to the ICOET abstract submission website.

 

Abstract Title:

List Your Presentation Topic Here

 

Primary Author:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

 

Co-Author:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

(Add other co-authors as needed.)

 

Requested Presentation Type:

Choose one – Podium, Lightning Talk, or Poster

 

Abstract (500 Words or Less):

Describe your project or study objectives; methodology; current or anticipated results or outcomes; major significance, implications and applicability of the results, practices and / or lessons learned; and, if applicable to your project, recommendations for future research.

 

Note if a Previously Presented Topic:

If your specific topic has been previously presented at ICOET—either by yourself, a co-author, or other colleague—please note this in your abstract. Describe how your presentation will bring fresh ideas to update the information and expand upon, or differ from, the previous presentation. Be sure to review the past proceedings of ICOET, available online at www.icoet.net, and search the Transportation Research Board TRID database at http://TRID.TRB.org, to look for projects, case-histories, and research-in-progress that may be similar to your proposed presentation.

 

 

Abstract Template for Event Proposals

You may copy/paste the text below into your word processing application, edit and save as a PDF, then upload to the ICOET abstract submission website.

 

Session Title:

List Your Presentation Topic Here

 

Primary Author / Organizer:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

 

Co-Author / Organizer:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

(Add other co-authors as needed.)

 

Facilitator / Moderator:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

Attendance Status: Confirmed or Tentative

Biographical Sketch (100 Words or Less)

 

Presenter 1:

Name, Title, Organization, City, State / Province, Country

Attendance Status: Confirmed or Tentative

Biographical Sketch (100 Words or Less)

(Add other presenters as needed.)

 

Session Description (500 Words or Less):

Describe the content to be presented in the session. Include goals and objectives; relevance to current or emerging issues in ecology and transportation; and applicability of the concepts, practices, and / or lessons learned.

 

Session Structure (250 Words or Less):

Describe the presentation format(s) to be used (e.g., podium lecture, panel discussion, breakout groups); the sequence of subtopics to be presented (if multiple presenters); and how audience participation will be incorporated into the session.

 

Note if a Previously Presented Topic:

If your specific topic has been previously presented at ICOET—either by yourself, a co-author, or other colleague—please note this in your abstract. Describe how your presentation will bring fresh ideas to update the information and expand upon, or differ from, the previous presentation. Be sure to review the past proceedings of ICOET, available online at www.icoet.net, and search the Transportation Research Board TRID database at http://TRID.TRB.org, to look for projects, case-histories, and research-in-progress that may be similar to your proposed presentation.

 

Review, Selection, and Publication

All abstract submissions are evaluated and scored on several criteria by multiple peer reviewers. The Program Committee considers score rankings, reviewer comments, and the diversity of topics and presenters in its final selection of presentations to be included in the conference.

Evaluation Criteria

All abstracts submitted to ICOET will be evaluated on:

  • How well the submission balances ecological and transportation aspects, and reflects an interdisciplinary approach involving engineering and ecological expertise;
  • Timeliness of the information, and applicability to current needs for practitioners;
  • Advancement of knowledge in the field, and potential for more widespread application;
  • Robustness of analysis and appropriateness of the methodology (papers, posters) or potential for initiating robust discussion (sessions);
  • Support of the conference theme; and
  • Overall clarity, organization, and completeness.

Submission Confirmation and Correspondence

The abstract Submitter—the person who uploads the abstract to the submission website—will receive a confirmation message acknowledging receipt of the abstract. Please save the confirmation email for your records in case of any errors with the online submission process. Third-party submitters should forward the confirmation email to the abstract’s Primary author/organizer.

ICOET will correspond with all Primary authors/organizers about the selection status of their abstract submissions. If the abstract is selected, the Primary author/organizer is responsible for coordinating communication among all co-authors, co-organizers, presenters and other relevant parties when preparing and submitting their required submission packet materials prior to the conference.

Publication of Presentations

ICOET will electronically publish the abstracts of all presentations from the conference in its online proceedings. A final version of your original abstract—revised and expanded as required—and a signed ICOET copyright verification form must be submitted following the notification of selection and prior to conference. Submission of your abstract and related presentation documents grants ICOET nonexclusive permission to publish.

 

Authors selected for Podium presentation, whose topics describe scientific research or similar work, also are invited to submit a full paper for the proceedings. Authors retain all rights to their papers for future publication in industry journals. Poster presenters also are encouraged to submit a PDF image of the poster for the proceedings. PowerPoint slides from Podium and Lightning Talk presentations also will be posted in the proceedings if requested by the author.

 

 

 

Conference Registration and Fees

Presenters and session organizers—including co-authors—selected for ICOET qualify for the reduced Presenter registration fee. All presenters must register and pay the conference fee by the publicized date (see Timeline page 2) in order for your presentation to be confirmed in the program. Please note that ICOET is unable to waive registration fees or reimburse for travel, lodging, meals, or other expenses required to attend the conference.

Questions about Your Submission

Contact Fraser Shilling (fmshillinng@ucdavis.edu) with the Road Ecology Center, UC Davis, if you have any questions about your abstract submission.

Road Ecology Center, the organizer of ICOET, is located at the University of California, Davis, California, USA.

We look forward to seeing you at ICOET 2019!